Stuff You Should Read:

How to Help Your Squat Catch Up with your Deadlift: Despite many people deadlifting more than they squat Greg Nuckols argues that these numbers should be much closer than we think. Nuckols breaks down why the squat isn't necessarily harder than the deadlift and some strategies to help your squat catch up to your deadlift.

https://www.strongerbyscience.com/help-squat-catch-deadlift/

Am I “Old”? Steven Petrow from The NY Times looks at the topic of old. When does one turn old and what does becoming old even mean? Petrow suggest it is time we stop defining people by their age

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/13/well/mind/age-aging-old-young-psychology.html

The Shoulder, Part 1: Scapular Dyskinesis: Austin Baraki and Michael Ray from barbell medicine look at shoulder pain and common diagnosis in this shoulder series. In part one they look at scapula dyskinesis; what is it and how can it affect one's training? If anyone has told you your scapula don't track properly or your glenohumeral rhythm is off you should give this one a read!

https://www.barbellmedicine.com/scapulardyskinesis/

Instagram Post of the Week:

In this week's Instagram post of the week; The Movement Maestro looks at the importance of sticking with therapy when injured. Just because one physical therapist doesn’t work out doesn’t mean you should give up on therapy!

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Reposted from @themovementmaestro - DM #925: Wise words from a wise man.

I always say that I learn just as much as the attendees when I teach a course, and this past weekend was no exception. @jai_jwrt dropped this on me while at dinner and he perfectly articulated a sentiment I’ve been trying to put words to for quite a few months now.

All therapist are NOT created equal. Don’t matter what the paradigm is. Some are amazing, some are shit. Remember that. All too often I’ll hear someone say “physical therapy didn’t work”. While I’m sure this exists in every profession, as a physical therapist this is something that hits close to home as it seems that many people are not able to differentiate the provider from the profession.

If you’re a patient and you’re reading this, take your health into your hands. Do your research. Learn what that therapy is actually about and actually supposed to entail. Leave the therapist behind if it isn’t a good fit but don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater.

If you’re a provider reading this, remember that we don’t know what we don’t know. Patients often times don’t know what good therapy looks like. What a good provider looks like. Show them. Show them what good therapy is. I realize that the majority of you reading this are some sort of provider. Please remember who your audience is, and let them know who you are. Do your part to make sure that that people can continue to believe in both the therapist and the therapy

Daily Maestroisms dropping whenever the craziness of life allows. Get yours.

Like it? Repost it. Don't understand it? Hit me up and get #Maestrofied.

---------------------------------------------- ~ Moving with the Maestro: From Assessment to Independence ~ A new way of thinking. A new way of treating. It’s time that continuing education got a makeover. Coming to a city near you. Link to register, as always, is in the bio.

Facebook Post of the Week:

In this week's Facebook post, Trustmephysiotherapist looks at how there is no one good posture.

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There is no one good posture...

Your best posture is your next posture!

Our body is designed to move, not to sit or stand in one rigid position all day.

Let’s all do the “180 degrees” today when doing your first patient history

Written By: Paul Milano